Carole Cadwalladr From Wikipedia

Carole Jane Cadwalladr (/kædˈwɒlədər/; born 1969) is a British author, investigative journalist and features writer. She is a features writer for The Observer and formerly worked at The Daily Telegraph. Cadwalladr rose to international prominence in 2018 when she exposed the Facebook–Cambridge Analytica data scandal.

Cadwalladr was a finalist for the 2019 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting, alongside The New York Times reporters, for her coverage of the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

Cadwalladr’s first novel, The Family Tree, was shortlisted for the 2006 Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, the Author’s Club First Novel Award, the Waverton Good Read Award, and the Wales Book of the Year. It was also a Daily Mail Book Club pick and was dramatised as a five-part serial on BBC Radio 4. In the US, it was a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice. The Family Tree was translated into several languages including Spanish, Italian, German, Czech, and Portuguese.

As a journalist, her work in the second decade of the twenty-first century has been about issues related to technology. She has for example, interviewed Jimmy Wales, the founder of Wikipedia.

Starting in late 2016 The Observer published an extensive series of articles by Cadwalladr about what she called the “right-wing fake news ecosystem”.